Quotations

signThe concept of reality is elusive. Sometimes a thousand words will tell you nothing of its essence, other times a one-line quote can capture a perception of this elusive quality. Therefore, maybe the following quotations are good place to begin our search for reality:

  • Reality is merely an illusion, albeit a very persistent one. Albert Einstein

  • All that you see or seem is but a dream within a dream. Edgar Allen Poe

  • We cannot know reality, but we know nothing really; for the truth lies deep down. Democritus

  • The human mind is not capable of grasping the Universe. We are like a little child entering a huge library. The walls are covered to the ceilings with books in many different tongues. The child knows that someone must have written these books. It does not know who or how. It does not understand the languages in which they are written. But the child notes a definite plan in the arrangement of the books, a mysterious order that it does not comprehend, but only dimly suspects. Einstein

  • Man does not see the real world. The real world is hidden from him by the wall of imagination. George Gurdjieff

  •  Reality is that which refuses to go away when I stop believing in it. Phillip K. Dick

  • Life is not a problem to be solved, but a reality to be experienced. Siren Kierkegaard

  • We can know only our own thoughts. All that is not thought is pure nothingness; since we can think only thoughts, and all the words we use to speak of things can express only thoughts, to say there is something other than thought is therefore an affirmation which can have no meaning. Thought is only a gleam in the midst of a long night. But it is this gleam that is everything. Henri Poincare

  • The mind of man is capable of anything, because everything is in it, all the past as well as all the future. Joseph Conrad
     
  • I have always been vaguely embarrassed by a kind of illusory quality in science, it was not a conspiracy but something more like the hoax in The Emperor's New Clothes. I had come to suspect, and now felt compelled to acknowledge, that science and the physical world were products of human imagining that we were not the cool observers of that world, but its passionate creators. We were poets and the world was our metaphor. Roger S Jones

  • There are certain queer times and occasions in this strange mixed affair we call life when a man takes this whole universe for a vast practical joke, though the wit thereof he but dimly discerns, and more than suspects that the joke is at nobody's expense but his own. Herman Melville: Moby Dick

  • Experiment does not inform us of the intrinsic nature of micro-objects, as they exist apart from measurement. Given one system of measurement, results are produced that suggest the presence of a wave phenomenon; given another system, the same measured object seems to be a particle. In the absence of any system of measurement, we have no evidence of waves, particles, or anything else. We may conclude, according to the above principle, that an electron existing as an independent entity is in principle unknowable; therefore this independent entity does not exist as a potentiality, for it does not exist at all. Alan Wallace

  • Practicing scientists must often be content with a state of knowledge, which does not reflect a unified version of reality. Douglas, McDaniel, and Alexander

  • Five senses; an incurably abstract intellect; a haphazardly selective memory; a set of preconceptions and assumptions so numerous that I can never examine more than a minority of them, never become conscious of them all. How much of total reality can such an apparatus let through? C. S. Lewis

  • When the doors of perception are cleansed, man will see reality for what it really is, infinite. William Blake

  • What we call reality is an agreement that people have arrived at to make life more liveable. Louise Nevelson

  • The whole drift of my education goes to persuade me that the world of our present consciousness is only one out of many worlds of consciousness that exist. William James

  • There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in your philosophy. William Shakespeare (Hamlet)

  • Things are not always what they seem. Phaedrus